Sedation is the reduction of irritability or agitation by administration of sedative drugs, generally to facilitate a medical procedure or diagnostic procedure.

Examples of drugs which can be used for sedation include propofol, etomidate, ketamine, fentanyl, and midazolam.

The future of anesthetic care involves the simultaneous administration of several drugs including IV medications and inhaled anesthetics.

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Before using sedation, doctors try to identify any of the following that may apply: A patient with any of these conditions must be evaluated for special procedures to minimize the risk of patient injury due to the sedation method.

In addition to the aforementioned precautions, patients should be interviewed to determine if they have any other condition that may lead to complications while undergoing treatment.

Socially, to be sedate is to be serene, quiet, and composed.

The process of sedation has two primary intentions.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists defines the continuum of sedation as follows: In the United Kingdom, deep sedation is considered to be a part of the spectrum of general anesthesia, as opposed to conscious sedation.

Prior to any oral sedation methods being used on a patient, screening must be done to identify possible health concerns.

Inhalation sedation is also sometimes referred to as relative analgesia.

Sedation is also used extensively in the intensive care unit so that patients who are being ventilated tolerate having an endotracheal tube in their trachea.

Additionally, sedation is often desirable to diminish fear associated with operative procedures.

Sedation is typically used for common diagnostic tests that require prolonged immobilization such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed axial tomography (CAT) scanning.

In general, most of the medications that induce sedation may alter breathing and cardiac stability.