You will never see any of the promised money, because there isn’t any.

And the worst thing is, this scam is not even new; its variant dates back to 1920s when it was known as ' The Spanish Prisoner' con.

All you are asked to do is cover the endless “legal” and other “fees” that must be paid to the people that can release the scammer’s money.

But instead of leading you to the real login https: site, the link will secretly redirect you to a fake website. This information is intercepted by the scammers, who later access your account and fleece you for several hundred dollars.

This phishing con , like all cons, depends on people believing the legitimacy of their emails and web pages.

A common variation is a woman in Africa who claimed that her husband had died, and that she wanted to leave millions of dollars of his estate to a good church.

In every variation, the scammer is promising obscenely large payments for small unskilled tasks.

In the meantime, if an email seems suspicious to you, do not trust it.

Being skeptical could save you hundreds of lost dollars.

This is the most widespread internet and email scam today. "Phishing" is where digital thieves lure you into divulging your password info through convincing emails and web pages.

These phishing emails and web pages resemble legitimate credit authorities like Citibank, e Bay, or Pay Pal.

They frighten or entice you into visiting a phony web page and entering your ID and password.

Commonly, the guise is an urgent need to "confirm your identity".

Because it was born out of hacking techniques, “fishing” is stylistically spelled "phishing" by hackers.